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Our Military Heroes – Happy 4th of July, America!

Learn more about these great exhibitions, web sites and the history of our military service that keeps the USA safe and proud.

Soldiers to Summits – This climbing expedition is designed to help wounded veterans overcome barriers in their lives. This year, the expedition will take place on Mt. Whitney. Located in California, it is the tallest peak in the contiguous U.S. with a top elevation of over 14,000 feet (the exact height varies depending on how it’s measured). Visit their website to learn how you can get involved.
Presidio to Pacific Powerhouse, How the Military Shaped San Diego Exhibit – This exhibit runs from April 26, 2014 to January 4, 2015. There are several special events this July, with speakers.
“It was an honor to be one of the first to see this exhibit and its fantastic documentation of the long standing tie between San Diego and our military,” said Captain Curt Jones, commanding officer, 32nd Street Naval Base San Diego.
Blue Star Moms & Blue Star Mothers Blue Star Mothers FaceBook here, a discussion of issues to military families, Moms in uniform and more. Blue Star Moms have chapters all over the USA, and provide support and service to our military.
There are also often campaigns to send postcards and letters to our Active Duty soldiers. It is a wonderful thing to do as a team (gather postcards) and sending an encouraging word is wonderful to receive. Look at all these bundles of postcards on their way to remote spots overseas.
The Veterans History Project (VHP) of the Library of Congress American Folklife Center is primarily an oral history program that collects and preserves the firsthand interviews of America’s wartime veterans. VHP relies on volunteers(both individuals and organizations) throughout the nation to contribute veterans’ stories to VHP. In addition to audio- and video-recorded interviews, VHP accepts memoirs and collections of original photographs, letters, diaries, maps and other historical documents from World War I to the present. For more information or to learn how you can participate, visit the Veterans History Project website. There is no deadline for participation.
 
Fourth of July
Did YOU Know?? 
When the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, few colonists wanted complete independence from Great Britain. By the following year, hostility toward Great Britain had grown along with the desire for an independent country.
On July 2, 1776 the Continental Congress voted for independence from Great Britain. Two days later, Congress signed and adopted the Declaration of Independence, and the United States has celebrated the Fourth of July every year since (Independence Day was officially declared a holiday in 1941).
Since 1776, millions of men and women have fought in multiple wars and served in peacetime to protect the United States and keep that independence.
There are approximately 23.2 million military veterans in the United States. 9.2 million Veterans are over the age of 65 and 1.9 million are under the age of 35. 1.8 million Veterans are women. Five states have veteran populations over 1 million: California, Florida, Texas, New York and Pennsylvania. (Information in this section was collected from History.com.)
 
As we celebrate Independence Day this month, thank a veteran, active military member and military family members for all he or she has done to keep the United States “the land of the free and the home of the brave.”
Did You Know?
  • In the Roman calendar July was originally called Quintillis, meaning fifth, because it was the fifth month. However, Julius Caesar added two months at the start of the year, and July became the seventh month. It was then named after Julius Caesar.
  • George Washington did not sign the Declaration of Independence; he was in New York City with his troops on July 4, 1776. John Adams believed that July 2 was the correct date on which to celebrate the birth of American independence and would reportedly turn down invitations to appear at July 4 events in protest.
  • In a remarkable coincidence, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the only signers of the Declaration of Independence to later serve as Presidents of the United States, died on the same day, July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the declaration.
  • A women’s rights convention was held at Seneca Falls, New York in July 1848. Topics discussed included voting rights, property rights and divorce. The convention marked the beginning of an organized women’s rights movement in the U.S.
  • President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on July 2, 1964, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race in public accommodations, publicly owned or operated facilities, employment and union membership and voter registration.
  • The American Pyrotechnics Association (APA) estimates that more than 14,000 fireworks displays light up U.S. skies each Fourth of July.
  • The famous Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest takes place on the Fourth of July at Nathan’s flagship restaurant on Coney Island. It has been held every year since 1916, except 1941, as a protest to the war in Europe and 1971 as a protest to civil unrest and the reign of free love.

 

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